Transferring Law Schools

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So many of you are gearing up for your very first semester of law school. Some of you have hopes of transferring. There are many reasons students want to transfer law schools, from location to law school ranking to scholarships. Transferring is a great way to graduate from a top law school, but it’s no cakewalk. Let’s discuss. If you end up not getting accepted into the school you really wanted to go to, transferring is an option.

If this is your plan, don’t be discouraged. It is a feasible option. First thing’s first. You need to make sure you are in the top 5% of your class. If you don’t feel like you can get the most stellar grades in law school, meaning nabbing those four to six As each professor gives out, then you should probably get a bit cozier with the thought of whatever law school has accepted you. Getting into the top 5% of your law school 1L class is difficult, but doable. You just need to sacrifice a lot of your social life. If you haven’t stopped reading by now, then transferring may well be an option for you!

Here are some more tips on transferring:

  1. Get into the top 5%
    I know we’ve already discussed this, but it’s necessary; though, not sufficient. See how everything comes full circle?
  2. Your current law school counts
    It still matters what law school you are applying from. The #4 person at a top 100 law school may not be able to compete with the #4 person at a top 30 law school when you are both applying to the same top 10 law school.
  3. Find a professor to give you a recommendation
    You need at least one law school professor to vouch for your stellar abilities and work ethic. Start befriending a few professors early on so you can really get a great letter.
  4. It’s a great time to transfer
    As we’ve discussed, law school applications are on the decline, so law schools are more likely to accept smaller incoming classes. But, they’d still like to make up those lost tuition dollars, and that’s where you come in!
  5. Personal Statement
    Remember not to “bash” your current law school in your personal statement. Instead, highlight facets of the school you are trying to transfer to; for instance, discuss programs or specific professors that inspire you.

Okay, remember, the most important thing is doing extremely well your first semester of law school. When you apply to transfer, you haven’t even received your second semester grades. Those do count, but the brunt of the decision is made on 1L first semester grades. Start getting organized and talking to older students who made it to the top 5% about how they did it and whether or not they’d be kind enough to share their outlines. Good luck!

Happy Studying!

Naz signature Updated on Aug 18, 2016