Unconventional Strategies to Lower Stress

Posted on

Stress is something that LSAT prep students are quite acquainted with. It’s hard not to stress after filling your days with Reading Comprehension passages and Logical Reasoning questions. I’m sure you’re getting suggestions left and right on how to minimize your stress load. We’ve even had many different blog posts on the various ways to help calm your LSAT Test psyche.

Today I thought we could go over a couple unconventional strategies to ward off stress. You know the drill: exercise, eat, sleep, drink water, take breaks, etc. But, there are a lot of other ways to minimize your nerves that you may never have been aware of! Let’s go over a few:

  1. Massage your ears
    Studies have shown gently rubbing your earlobes with your thumb and index finger, along with squeezing the outer edges of your ears from bottom to top, triggers reflect points in your ears that relax specific areas of your body.
  2. Increase your vitamin C intake
    There has been plenty of research on the effects of vitamin C showing that it reduces both the physical and psychological effects of stress. So, as you continue to complete those MPRE practice questions, make sure to chug some OJ.
  3. Cry
    This is probably the oddest one. But, those who have taken a BAR exam review course can remember times during MPRE practice questions, the urge to shed a dismal tear(s) was tough to fight off. Try letting the tears flow for a change. Crying lowers your manganese level, which helps elevate your mood and lowers your stress!
  4. Eat slower
    Eating more slowly actually promotes mindfulness. The more mindful you are, the easier it is to take control of your mood and anxiety levels. Plus, eating slowly is much healthier for your digestive system!

So, if you feel like you’ve exhausted the common list of tricks to lower your stress level, fret not! Try out some of the strategies above and you may just be surprised at how much calmer you’ll soon feel! Keep up the hard work!

Happy Studying!

Updated on Aug 18, 2016