Some ornithologists believe that many species of songbirds are threatened by deforestation. Yet they also claim that,...

John on January 2 at 03:54PM

question 13 sec 2 June '14

I could use some clarification on this. Thanks

3 Replies

Ravi on January 5 at 06:48PM

@jack515,

Happy to help.

We're tasked identifying the role that the claim that there has
recently been reforestation plays in the ornithologists' argument. We
know that the overall conclusion of their argument is that matters
continue to worsen in spite of recent reforestation efforts. The
support for the conclusion that matters continue to worsen is since it
is fragmentation of forest rather than reduction of forest size that
endangers songbird species. Further support for the conclusion is
given when the stimulus describes why open spaces and corridors are
problematic to songbirds (they reduce the distances of songbird nests
from unforested areas and thus reduce the songbirds' natural shield
from predators).

Based on our analysis of the argument, it sounds like the claim that
there has been recent reforestation is something that is described as
something that is happening but is not preventing the outcome of the
conclusion. Let's look at the answer choices now.

Answer A is incorrect because it says that the claim that there has
recently been reforestation is used as evidence that various species
of songbirds will continue to be threatened with extinction. It's not
used as evidence; it's not reforestation that's causing songbirds to
be continuing to face the threat of extinction, it's in spite of
reforestation efforts, matters are worsening for songbirds. This
answer is out.

Answer B is incorrect because the ornithologists are not rejecting the
claim that there has been recent forestation. In fact, they
acknowledge this claim. This answer is out.

Answer C is correct; it says that the claim is presented as a
phenomenon that is compatible with the ornithologists' claim that the
threat to songbirds continues to worsen. This is correct. The claim is
a phenomenon that we would expect to help the problem, but we're shown
that it is actually compatible with the problem worsening.

Answer D is incorrect because the claim is not used as evidence that
the songbirds' predators will continue to have a habitat. For one,
this is descriptively inaccurate. Secondly, we don't even know where
the songbirds' predators' habitat is.

Answer E is incorrect because it says that the claim is used for
evidence that songbirds' predators are threatened by extinction unless
they have open spaces and corridors that give them access to their
prey. We have no idea whether or not the songbirds' predators are
facing extinction, so this answer is out. It's also out because, most
importantly, it doesn't describe the role that the claim plays in the
ornithologists' argument.

Hope this helps. Let us know if you have any more questions—we're here to help!

Adam on March 15 at 03:49AM

you said that C is correct because reforestation is "compatible with the condition worsening." Since that is the case, doesn't it serve as evidence that songbirds are continuing to face the threat of extinction?

Adam on March 15 at 03:54AM

I'm just not sure how to differentiate answer c from answer a since both seem to rely on the fact that reforestation creates evidence or support that the threat to songbirds continues to worsen.