Assume that the partners of the firm are ranked according to their salaries, from first (highest) to ninth (lowest), ...

Ava on February 22 at 02:24AM

Game Sequence

I’m a bit confused as to the order in which this question is read. For example why is is that you can count up sixth place from K to I to L to F to M to G but you could not count instead from K to I to L to F to M to G?

1 Reply

Ravi on February 22 at 07:23PM

@shafieiava,

Happy to help. I'm not quite sure I understand your specific question,
as the ordering you listed is the same for both scenarios you
described. If this response doesn't clarify things, let me know what
you'd like more clarification on, and I'll be happy to help.

We know that K is in the first position, and we also have these two
chains from the information in the rules:

L-N

I-F-M-G-J-H

K_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

The question asks, "Assume that the partners of the firm are ranked
according to their salaries, from first (highest) to ninth (lowest),
and that no two salaries are the same. Which one of the following is a
complete and accurate list of Glassen’s possible ranks?"

Becuase there are no ties, we know there are nine slots since we have
nine game pieces. Based on our chains, we know that G has to be lower
than K, I, F, and M, so the highest G could possibly go is 5th. We
also know that G has to be higher than both J and H, so the lowest G
could possibly go is 7th. Could G go in 6th? Well, if we give L a
higher salary than G, then G could go in 6th since it would have 5
pieces before it. It would be fine if L had a higher salary than G
since the only relationship L has is with N (going before it).

From this, we know that G could also go 6th if there are no ties, so
(D), which states that G could go 5th, 6th, or 7th, is the correct
answer.

Does this make sense? Let us know if you have any more questions!