The author uses the word "immediacy" (line 39) most likely in order to express

on June 24 at 11:37PM

Sufficient and Necessary - Example 3

I am confused on why example three was diagrammed in this way. Particularly the sentence: "Drastic shifts in climate change always result in migrations, and migrations bring about the intermingling of ideas necessary for rapid advances in civilization." Though "always" is not one of the words we have listed as a rule, this is now the second time it has been used within two examples - so I take it this is one two look out for? the second part of the sentence is what really is confusing for me. "Migrations bring about the intermingling of ideas necessary for rapid advances of civilization." Why is that broken up in two parts as M - II / RAC - II ? Though generally the videos are helpful, the explanation in the video here is extremely unclear?

1 Reply

Ravi on July 12 at 06:24PM

@hales,

Happy to help.

We have

DSC - >M
M - >II
RAC - >II

The word "always" introduces a necessary condition, so this is
definitely one to look out for.

Regarding the second part of the sentence, you could diagram it two ways:

M - >IINRAC

or

M - >II
RAC - >II

the first way combines all of the last part of the sentence into one.
The second way provides more granularity, and it's a better way to
diagram what's going on because it gives us more detail.

"Migrations bring about the intermingling of ideas necessary for rapid
advances in civilization"

The first part of the sentence, we write as

M - >II

"bring about" introduces a necessary condition, so this is why the
diagram is M - >II

The second part of the sentence tells us that the intermingling of
ideas is necessary for rapid advances in civilization. If something is
necessary, then it's required, and this lets us know it's in the
necessary condition.

RAC - >II

Hope this helps. Let us know if you have any questions!