People who have doctorates in the liberal arts are interested in improving their intellects. Companies, however, rare...

on July 24 at 12:56AM

What’s the difference?

I’m having trouble understanding the difference between answers C and E. They seem like they’re gestating the exact same thing. What makes E a better answer?

1 Reply

Ravi on July 24 at 05:19AM

@iakselrud,

Happy to help. Let's take a look at (C) and (E).

This is a strengthen with a sufficient premise. We're looking for the
answer choice that, if true, makes the argument valid.

Here's how we can diagram the stimulus:

L - >I (L stands for doctorates in the liberal arts and I stands for
interested in improving intellect)
/C - >R (/C stands for not concerned with financial gain and R stands
for companies rarely hiring)

Conclusion:

L - >R

We need to bridge the gap in the argument by connecting I with /C
(I - >/C) so that we can have L - >I - >/C - >R to conclude L - >R

(C) says, "The only people not interested in making money in the
business world are people who are interested in improving their
intellects."

This is the inverse of what we're looking for. "The only" introduces
the sufficient condition, so (C) is diagrammed as /C - >I. We need
I - >/C, so (C) is out.

(E) says, "Only people not concerned with making money in the business
world are interested in improving their intellects."

This is just what we're looking for. "Only" introduces the necessary
condition, so this can be diagrammed as I - >/C, and I - >/C is just
what we need to bridge the gap in the argument.

L - I

I - >/C (what we're adding)

/C - >R

Conclusion: L - >R

(E) makes the argument valid, so it's the correct answer choice.

Does this make sense? Let us know if you have any more questions!