The differing conceptions of fiction held by Jewett and the domestic novelists can most reasonably be taken as provid...

Alyssa on September 13, 2019

Why C over D ?

How did you eliminate the other answer choices?

1 Reply

Shunhe on December 31 at 08:03PM

Hi @alva,

Here, the question is asking us about what the differing conception of fiction held by domestic novelists and Jewett can tell us. These different conceptions of fiction are brought up starting at line 27 in the passage. Why are these different conceptions of fiction brought up int he first place? They help explain why Jewett's novels lack promotions of domestic morality and religious beliefs in them, and also give us the background that Jewett's books there to be seen as an end in themselves, not a means to an end.

(A) seems correct at first blush, but it goes too far in saying that Jewett was unwilling to feature children and religious themes as prominently. It wasn't a matter of unwillingness; just because Jewett's conception of fiction caused her to not put them in as prominently doesn't mean she was reluctant to put them in.

(B) isn't discussed at all in this part of the passage, and so should be rather quickly eliminated.

(C) is correct because, unlikely (A), it focuses on Jewett's constraints as opposed to her own willingness to portray children/religious themes. Her different conception put less constraints n her in terms of the purpose of her novels, allowing her to be more free in her inclusion of certain subjects or themes.

(D) is incorrect because the passage doesn't talk about Jewett or the domestic novelists focusing predominantly on women and their concerns in lines 27 and after. Is there a part that you thought provided support for (D)?

(E) is wrong because it talks about Jewett's inability to feature children or religion. It's not that she wasn't able to, it's just that she didn't feel the need to.

Hope this helps! Feel free to ask any further questions.