Any literary translation is a compromise between two goals that cannot be entirely reconciled: faithfulness to the me...

on December 11 at 03:08AM

B

Why doesn't B work?

3 Replies

Ben on December 12 at 11:41PM

Hi Tomgbean, thanks for the question!

This argument can be broken down as follows:

Translations must compromise between faithfulness to the author's meaning and faithfulness to the author's style. It is impossible to have both. Therefore, even the best translation is a flawed representation of an original work.

We need to supply a principle that strengthens this. The idea is that our reasoning is we cannot have both faithfulness to meaning and to style. And due to this, even the best translation is flawed.

Answer choice D provides exactly that by making explicit the rule that if we cannot have both faithfulness to meaning and to style, then even the best translation must be flawed.

Answer choice B reverses this. Telling us what must be the case if a translation is flawed. But we are trying to justify what makes a translation flawed.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any other questions!

on December 14 at 04:28AM

Thanks Ben!

Ravi Tuesday at 10:36PM

@tomgbean, let us know if you have any other questions!