The earliest that the Kahlo could be auctioned is

on January 6, 2020

Please explain

Could you please explain this game for me? Thank you.

Reply

Irina on January 7, 2020

@sprozes,

This is a linear game that requires us to determine the order of six paintings - J K N R S V.

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

The following rules apply:

(1) J cannot be auctioned immediately before or after V.
This rule tells us that we cannot have JV or VJ combination.
~ (VJ v JV)

(2) V must be auctioned off earlier than K, and K must be auctioned earlier than S
This rule tells us that we have the following chain, meaning that S cannot be auctioned first or second, K cannot be auctioned first or sixth, and V cannot be auctioned fifth or sixth:

V < K< S


___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
1 2 3 4 5 6
~S ~S ~V ~V
~K ~K


(3) N must be auctioned second or third.
/N /N
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
1 2 3 4 5 6
~S ~S ~V ~V
~K ~K

(4) R must be auctioned earlier than N.

R>N

Since N must be auctioned second or third, we can conclude that R must be first or second.

/R R/N /N
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
1 2 3 4 5 6
~S ~S ~V ~V
~K ~K

Considering how restrictive these two rules are, this game can be reduced to three base scenarios:

(1) R N V K J/S S/J
(2) R __ N __ __ __
(a) R V N __ __ __ K/S/J are free variables and could go in any order as long as K (b) R J N V K S
(3) __ R N __ __ __
(a) V R N __ __ __ K/S/J are free variables and could go in any order as long as K < S
(b) J R N V K S

With this in mind, let's look at the questions. The question asks us when is the earliest K could be auctioned off. By looking at the scenarios above, we can see that the earliest K could be is 4th because the first three slots are always taken by a combination of V/J R N (D).

Let me know if this makes sense and if you have any other questions.