The passage states which one of the following?

on February 14 at 07:00PM

Question 4&5

I understand the difference between identifying whether it's an argument or facts. But, in the video tutorial the guy does not set it up like we would with any other sufficient&necessary question or any quantifier question. Should I worry about more ways to set up questions for the lsat?

1 Reply

on February 16 at 09:31PM

Hello @mkonovodoff,

Good question! I don't think that you should worry, but I do think that there are important concepts here that you should become familiar with. In this stimulus, I don't see any if/then statements or conditional reasoning, so I knew I wasn't going to diagram sufficient and necessary. I also didn't see our usual quantifier indicators like most or some.

Question 4 is a good example of LSAT math. It is mostly about understanding fractions and percentages. I can almost guarantee that there will be certain LSAT questions that expect you to know the difference between rate/percentage vs. quantity/absolute number. Question 4 is one such question. It is worth your time to practice these.

We don't have a standard way of diagramming this type of question. Mehran was probably able to answer this one without writing anything down, but he wrote down these fractions as a demonstration. It is all about personal preference, and what makes the most sense to you. I have found myself making tables like the one in the video, or even venn diagrams.

This question basically wants us to explain the following:

How can 50% of X be equal to 75% of Y?

The only way this is possible, is if X is greater than Y! It is quite simple when I put it that way. The hard part is extracting these simple equations from the passage. Plugging in your own numbers and testing them (as Mehran did on the left side) is a good way to understand this logic. This is a valid strategy on the test, but eventually you will be able to understand this without too much writing.