Museum curator: Our ancient Egyptian collection includes an earthenware hippopotamus that resembles a child's toy. It...

Ava on March 9 at 05:08PM

Answer choice B

Can someone explain why answer choice B is incorrect? I hard a hard time distinguishing the flaw in logic here. If anything, it seems that the notion of it being a religious object is not well supported by the premises. Can someone explain how they arrived at the correct answer, and why B is incorrect? Thanks in advance.

1 Reply

Ravi on March 9 at 09:16PM

@shafieiava,

Let's look at (B) and (D).

This is a strengthen with a necessary premise question, so we can use
the negation test to find the right answer. The correct answer choice,
when negated, will wreck the argument.

(B) says, "Earthenware figures were never used as children's toys in
ancient Egypt."

(B)'s negation would say, "Earthenware figures were sometimes used as
children's toys in ancient Egypt."

While it is necessary that the hippopotamus was not just a children's
toy, it is not necessary that figures were never used as children's
toys. The argument doesn't discuss other figures, so we don't care
about them. Thus, (B) is too strong to be necessary, so it's out.

(D) says, "The hippopotamus' legs were not broken through some natural
occurrence after it was placed in the tomb."

(D)'s negation would say, "The hippopotamus' legs were broken through
some natural occurrence after it was placed in the tomb."

If some sort of environmental factor such as a strong wind caused the
broken legs on the hippopotamus, that would be an alternative cause.
It's necessary to the argument that a natural occurrence isn't the
explanation. (D)'s negation wrecks the argument, so (D) is the correct
answer choice.

Does this make sense? Let us know if you have any other questions!