A reason Larson cannot do the assignment is that she has an unavoidable scheduling conflict. On the other hand, a rea...

on March 10 at 10:56AM

Please explain why A isn't a necessary assumption

Please explain why A isn't a necessary assumption for the argument. Thanks!

1 Reply

Ravi on March 10 at 04:26PM

@amf,

Let's look at (A).

(A) says, "Larson has the assertiveness the task requires."

(A)'s negation would say, "Larson DOES NOT have the assertiveness the
task requires."

We know from the stimulus that Larson can't do the task because of a
scheduling conflict. We do not know anything about his assertiveness,
nor do we care about it. Why? Well, it does not matter if Larson could
do the task otherwise because we already know that the can't do it.
Thus, the only necessary premises to arrive at the conclusion that
Parker must do it are that Larson can't do it, Franks can't do it, and
no one else can do it. Thus, (A)'s negation doesn't wreck the
argument, so it's out.

Does this make sense? Let us know if you have any other questions!