Plant species differ in that renewed growth in spring can be triggered by day length or by temperature or else by a c...

Ryan on June 28 at 09:46PM

Quantifiers

After reading C it made sense. However, I thought if the stimulus does or does not include quantifiers, then the answer Choice would reflect that for parallel reasoning questions . I eliminated C right off the bat because it used some. Doe this rule not apply?

1 Reply

Shunhe on June 29 at 04:30PM

Hi @Ryan-Whyte,

Thanks for the question! So the mistake you made here is automatically assuming that just because you see the word “some,” we’re going to be using conditional logic based on quantifiers, or conversely, just because you don’t see the word “some,” we’re not using conditional logic based on quantifiers. Look at this rephrasing of the original first sentence: some plant species have renewed growth in spring that can be triggered by day length, some have renewed growth in spring that can be triggered by temperature, and some have renewed growth in spring that can be triggered by both. Well, that means the same thing as the original first sentence, but now it matches the sentence in (C). Or, similarly, we can rephrase (C) to say: Landfills differ in that they charge by volume, by weight, or by both. This means the same thing as the original sentence but is now rewritten to fit the stimulus. So really, you can’t automatically eliminate an answer choice based on the presence of the word “some” in the stimulus and the absence of it in the answer choice. What really matters is if the underlying reasoning is the same, which it is here.

Hope this helps! Feel free to ask any other questions that you might have.