There are two kinds of horror stories: those that describe a mad scientist's experiments and those that describe a mo...

on September 12, 2020

A vs E

can someone please explain why A is wrong and why E is right? To me, E was a stretch because of the words "employing symbolism."

Reply

Shunhe on September 12, 2020

Hi @hfatima1,

Thanks for the question! So we’re basically told in this question that there’s two kinds of horror stories, mad scientist ones and monstrous beasts ones. So we can diagram this as

Horror Story —> Mad scientist v Monstrous Beast

We’re also told at the end that both of these kinds of horror stories share two features, describing violations of the law of nature and intending to produce dread in the reader. We can diagram this as

Horror Story —> Describe violations of the laws of nature & Intended to produce dread in reader

Now, let’s take a look at (A). It tells us that all descriptions of monstrous beasts describe violations of the laws of nature. Well, this could certainly be true if we knew that all descriptions of monstrous beasts were horror stories. But do we know that? No, we don’t. There could be descriptions of monstrous beasts in other kinds of stories, like fantasy novels or something. And so we can’t get (A) from the statements, which makes it wrong in this Must Be True question.

So now let’s take a look at (E), which tells us that some stories that employ symbolism describe violations of the laws of nature. Well, we know that some horror stories about monstrous beasts have symbolism (specifically, the monster symbolizing psychological disturbance int he protagonist). So we know that

Horror stories <—some—> Symbolism
?But remember, we know that

Horror stories —> Describe violations of laws of nature

And so we can say that

Describe violations of laws of nature <—some—> Symbolism

and that’s what (E) says.

Hope this helps! Feel free to ask any other questions that you might have.