Taxi drivers, whose income is based on the fares they receive, usually decide when to finish work each day by setting...

Joseph on December 28, 2015

Why B?

I need some help understanding this question...

1 Reply

Mehran on February 5, 2016

@Joseph The stimulus tells us that taxi drivers typically work fewer hours on a busy day than on a slow day because taxi drivers stop working when they reach their daily income target.

The question here is asks, "The facts described above provide the strongest evidence AGAINST which one of the following?"

So we are basically looking for an answer choice that conflicts with the facts in the stimulus.

(B) says, "People work longer when their effective hourly wage is high than when it is low."

This conflicts with the information in the stimulus, which told us that taxi drivers typically work fewer hours on a busy day than on a slow day.

Some numbers will make this clear. Let's set our hypothetical tax driver's daily target at $100.

Say it is a really busy day and he makes $100 in two hours and stops driving. His effective hourly rate would have been $50.

Now imagine it was a slow day so it takes our taxi driver four hours to make $100 before he stops driving. In this situation, his effective hourly rate would have been $25.

So when our effective hourly wage was $50 the taxi driver worked 2 hours but he worked 4 hours when our effectively hourly wage was $25.

This is the opposite of what is stated in (B).

Hope this helps! Please let us know if you have any other questions.