A recent study of 10,000 people who were involved in automobile accidents found that a low percentage of those drivin...

Ariella on March 15, 2017

?

Can you explain please?

2 Replies

Mehran on April 1, 2017

@ariella so the conclusion here is, "Thus, one is less likely to be injured in an automobile accident if one drives a large car rather than a small car."

The support provided? A low percentage of those driving large automobiles at the time of their accidents were injured but a high percentage of those who were driving small automobiles at the time of their accidents were injured.

This evidence shows that when an accident occurs one is less likely to be injured if driving a large car.

But what is the relative frequency of accidents for large cars versus small cars?

This is a Weaken question, so we are looking for an answer choice that casts doubt on the conclusion here.

(B), (C) and (E) can be eliminated right away because they are completely irrelevant.

(A) is the trap answer here. It is trying to get you to think that speed is the reason for this difference but we have no information regarding the speed of the vehicles at the time of the accidents.

(D) on the other hand points out exactly what I set forth above. If large automobiles are far more likely to be involved in an accident than small automobiles, this seriously weakens the argument that one is less likely to be injured in an automobile accident if one drives a large car rather than a small car.

Hope that helps! Please let us know if you have any other questions.

Andrea on November 9, 2017

I am still confused. Just because a large automobile is more likely to be involved in an accident doesn't mean it is more likely to result in injury if an accident involves a large automobile.